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Protecting Pets From Disease:
Pet Vaccinations

Pet Vaccinations

All Pets Animal Hospital & 24-Hour Emergency Care offers vaccinations to protect pets from some of the most common and deadly diseases. We follow the AAHA vaccination standards for cats and dogs to ensure we neither over– nor undervaccinate. All pets need a physical exam before vaccinations so that our vets can check their vitals and make sure they are healthy and able to receive the vaccinations without adverse effects.

Bengalcat kitten brown spotted bengal

Vaccinations fall into two different categories: core and non-core. Core vaccinations are shots that are recommended or required by law for all pets. The non-core vaccinations are for pets that are in special situations, whether through risks associated with the area they live, the activities they participate in, or the pet’s condition.

Below are our veterinarian’s recommendations based on the AAHA standards.

Cats

  • Core vaccinations (“must have” or required by law)
    • We use only pure, nonadjuvenated feline vaccines to help prevent risk of reaction and vaccine-site associated tumor formation.
    • FVRCP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia, a.k.a. “feline distemper”) combination—Protects against three viruses. First vaccination is at 8 weeks with two boosters, four weeks apart. As adults, outdoors cats are given boosters annually while indoors cats are every three to seven years.
    • Rabies—Rabies is given at 12 weeks and then annually.
  • Non-core vaccinations (based on special risk)
    • Feline leukemia virus (FVLP)—Spread among outdoor cats or multiple cat households by direct contact with bodily fluids. The first dose is given at 12 weeks, with a booster in two to four weeks followed by annual boosters.
    • FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus, or “feline AIDS”) and FIP (feline infectious peritonitis virus)—Vaccinations are not currently recommended by the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) or American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA).

Dogs

  • Core vaccinations
    • DA2P combination (distemper, hepatitis, adenovirus type 2, parainfluenza)—Puppies receive the first vaccination between 6 to 8 weeks, and then three boosters, two to three weeks apart. Thereafter, a booster is given every three years.
    • Bordetella (kennel cough)—The first vaccination (intranasally or by injection) is given at 2 to 8 weeks, with a booster every six to 12 months, depending on exposure.
    • Rabies—The initial vaccine is given at 12 weeks, followed by an annual booster, and then every one to three years depending on the type of vaccine used.
    • Canine influenza—This virus can cause severe, fatal pneumonia. It is necessary in dogs that go to grooming salons, boarding kennels, dog shows, dog parks, and so on. Puppies should be vaccinated starting at 12 weeks, with a booster two to four weeks later, and then annually.
  • Non-core vaccinations
    • Leptospirosis—This bacterial disease is spread in the urine of wildlife and outdoor dogs. It damages the liver and kidneys and is contagious to people. There is an initial vaccine at 12 weeks, with a booster two to four weeks later, and then annually.
    • Lyme disease—This bacterial, tick-borne disease requires dogs with risk of tick exposure to receive this vaccination starting at 12 weeks, with a booster two to four weeks later, and then annually. People can also be infected with Lyme disease.
removed 03-08-2017

What Our Clients Are Saying:

I like using All Pets Animal Hospital for routine veterinary care, and I like that, if we have any emergency, we already have a history with them on our pets.
Valerie Pyland